2017년 7월 28일 금요일

Korean Studies Courses for Fall 2017

Junior Level Courses

37571 Governance and Human Security in East Asia (Professor Brendan Howe, Ph.D.)

This course examines the duty to care incumbent on those who govern towards those who are governed in East Asia. It starts with an inquiry into the concept of “governance,” examining the multitude of political, economic, and ethical dilemmas and theoretical issues associated with it from the perspective of the universal entitlement rights and concurrent responsibilities associated with the concept of global citizenship. It then moves on to discussing the pragmatic issues generated by concerns about human security, organizing them around a set of “responsibilities” towards the most vulnerable sections of national and international society.  The world of today seems to be prone to conflicts, some of which are so violent that they pull down governance and public administration institutions and structures. In such instances, the whole governance and public administration system and structure must be rebuilt from “scratch.” The process is not only long and highly expensive, but also requires careful analysis of the causes of the conflict in the first place, and the nature of the governance and public administration that should be put in place to avoid the recurrence of conflict and destruction.

37569 Korean Business Ethics: Korean Negotiation and Conflict Resolution (Professor Jasper Kim, JD/MBA, Attorney at Law (Washington, DC))



This course combines Korean business ethics and negotiations using “business simulations”, “experimental games” and “core concepts” that mirror real-world situations. Such unique opportunities will allow you to “apply” the theories and concepts related to business ethics in a “real world”, “hands-on” context. Issues such as cultural factors influencing business ethics in South Korea and beyond as well as trends in business ethics and corporate social responsibility will be covered primarily from a negotiation context. Moreover, questions such as following will be covered: How do you “win” negotiations in an ethical manner? What is “success” in negotiations? What can you do to become a better and more ethical negotiator? This highly engaging will directly expose you to both the “theory” and “practice” of ethics and negotiations as a process within a strategic communication and negotiation framework.

For clarity, no prerequisite course exists for this course. Although the course will be in English, the course instructor will make best efforts to accommodate those who are still improving their language skills. The course’s enrollment is limited so early registration is highly recommended.

37552 Reading Academic Korean II (Professor Ji-hye Ha, Ph.D.)


This course is the second course to improve academic reading ability. To this end, they can develop the ability to understand the structure and contents of the text after reading topical writings in various fields such as politics, economy, society and culture. Furthermore, they can also improve the analytical ability of the text. Through this course, foreign students will be able to read and understand even the texts of professional areas by improving the overall Korean reading ability. Korean ability of Test of Proficiency in Korean (TOPIK) Level 4 or above is required. It is not mandatory, but recommended for students taking Reading Academic Korean I.

37570 Korean Studies Seminar: Korea and Empires (Professor Sang-ho Ro, Ph.D.)

This seminar examines historical interactions between Korea and Empires from the nineteenth century to the twentieth century. As a key area of regional security, hegemony, and economy, Korea has been dynamically engaged with global and regional powers in East Asia. In this seminar, we will analyze how Korea resisted, negotiated, and collaborated with Empires – China, Japan, Russia, and the US – for the last two centuries. The emphasis is on contested national identity, colonialism, nationalism, and Korean choices in the changing regional and global order in East Asia. This seminar is an upper-level course for those who are major in East Asian, Korean studies or history.

Sophomore Level Courses

37561 North Korean Society and Culture (Professor Kyong-Mi Danyel Kwon, Ph.D.)

With the recent passing of Kim Jŏng-il and the new “supreme leader” Kim Jŏng-ŭn staking his claim on North Korea, the world has renewed its interest in what may be one of the most closed-off and the least known countries in the world. In order to gain better insights to North Korean society, the course provides a comprehensive overview of its history and culture through films and comics produced by North Koreans, South Koreans, and others. The course aims to investigate the actual lives of North Korean people vis-à-vis the image that the regime tries to project to the world versus the international community’s biases othering North Korea given that the country is closed off to the outside world and allows only a parochial view of the people and their everyday lives. Topics such as nationalism, diaspora, gender and sexuality, as well as the revolutionary aesthetics will be explored in order to deepen our understanding of North Korea and the two Koreas at large.

37559 Introduction to Premodern Korean Literature (Professor In-Hye Han, Ph.D.)

Introduction to Premodern Korean Literature is a survey course examining various forms and themes of Korean literature from Silla to late Chosŏn periods. Premodern writer and intellectuals viewed that literary, philosophical and historical knowledges and writings were invariably intertwined and inseparable, a stance that contradicts the modern idea about an independent discipline. This course focuses on reading exemplary texts from premodern Korea and analyzing the intersection of genre, theme, and philosophy (or religion) that constitutes each literary work. Firstly, literary genres we look at include hyangga, sijo, kasa, p’ansori, folk drama, poetry, fiction and literary criticism. Secondly, themes of literature that we read range from love, suffering, and women, to family, monarch, and enlightenment. Finally, philosophy and religion underlying premodern literature include (Neo-) Confucianism, Buddhism, Daoism, shamanism, geomancy, and indigenous beliefs. By comparing discursive modes of literature to those of philosophy and religion, we investigate how premodern Korean literature created and otherwise unattainable cultural space.

37558 Introduction to Korean Music (Professor Heather Willoughby, Ph.D.) 

Sorry. This course is cancelled.

This course is designed to introduce the student to a variety of music cultures from Korea.  By studying specific pieces of music, we will explore some of the ways in which Koreans have historically and culturally approached concepts of sound, acoustic arts, music and performance practices.  In the process the student will increase her listening skills, gain a vocabulary with which to intellectually discuss music, and learn to analyze certain aspects of music, meaning, and culture. (However, the no prerequisite knowledge of or experience with music is necessary.) In so doing we will investigate issues of identity (including gender identity), class, historiography, aesthetics and cultural and philosophical ideologies.


37556 Introduction to Korean Culture (Professor Sharon Yoon, Ph.D.)


What is culture? How do we study it? Is culture defined and confined by national boundaries? How might one nation’s culture change and/or be influenced by external forces? This course answers this set of questions. In particular, we will study how various social institutions—such as the family, the workplace, the nation, and the school system—help shape contemporary understandings of Korean culture. Each week focuses on the influence of a specific type of institutional force through formal lectures, classroom discussion, and students’ presentations.

2017년 7월 6일 목요일

Special Lecture Sponsored by Korean Studies at Ewha International Summer College

Two special lectures took place at Professor Todd Henry's class, "Sex, Gender, Sexuality in Korea", on July 6, Ewha ECC B150.

류민희 (Minhee Ryu)
공익인권변호사모임 희망을만드는법 (Korean Lawyers for Public Interest and Human Rights)
한국의 성소수자 인권 (LGBTI rights in South Korea: Challenges and Opportunities)


Darim YUN (Candy)
Korean Sexual-minority Culture & Rights Center
Past & Current LGBTAIQ+ situation in Korea




Job Opportunity at Korean Cultural Center UK

모 집 공 고

주영한국문화원에서는 <공연 기획 및 사업 운영>을 담당할 직원을 모집합니다.

1. 주요업무
문화원 공연 프로그램 기획 및 운영
기타 문화원 사업 운영 등

2. 응모자격
영국 체류자격에 문제가 없는 사람
영어 및 한국어에 모두 능통한 사람
해당분야 실무 3년 이상 경력자 우대

3. 제출서류
이력서 (국문영문)
자기소개서 (국문영문)
학위증추천서영어성적컴퓨터 자격증 (해당사항 있는 경우)

4. 근무조건
근무시작일 : 2017년 7월 말 또는 8월 초
향후 일정에 따라 근무 시작일이 변경될 수 있습니다.
근무시간 주 5일 / 09:00~18:00 (1일 8시간 점심시간 1시간 제외)
행사 일정에 따라 필요시 야간 및 주말 근무 가능
보수 월 2,775 상당 (주거보조비 포함경력에 따라 조정될 수 있음)

5. 접수처
전자메일 : byunghyun.roh@kccuk.org.uk
우편송부 : Korean Cultural Centre UK
Grand Buildings, 1-3 Strand, London WC2N 5BW
(겉봉에 <현지직원 지원서 재중명기 요망)

6. 서류 접수기한 : 2017년 7월 9()까지
우편 접수의 경우서류 접수기한 도착분까지 유효

7. 기타 참고사항 :
서류 심사 통과자에 한해 개별 면접을 실시 (한국 체재자의 경우 온라인 면접)
서류 통과 여부구체 면접 일정최종합격여부는 해당자에게만 개별 통보
기재내용이 사실과 다른 경우 채용을 취소할 수 있음
합격자는 수습기간 3개월을 거쳐 최종 임용예정이나합격자의 경력 등을 고려하여 수습기간은 단축될 수 있음

Student Internship Opportunity at Korea Foundation

국민과 함께하는 세계 수준의 공공외교 전문기관을 꿈꾸는 한국국제교류재단이
공공외교의 첨병이 될 젊고 패기 있는 여러분들을 기다립니다.

1. 누가 지원가능한가요?
  ○ 국내외 대학 또는 대학원에 재학 중이거나 입학이 확정된 분은 누구나 KF 학생인턴에 지원하실 수 있습니다.
  ○ 최대 60일간 근무가 가능하신 분이어야 합니다.
  ○ 오피스프로그램(한글, 워드, 엑셀, 파워포인트 등) 능숙자와 영어 능통자를 우대합니다.

2. 근무조건은 어떤가요?
  ○ 전일근무(09:00~18:00, 월-금)를 원칙으로 하고 있습니다. 특별한 사정이 있는 경우 협의를 통해 격일근무(일주일에 3일 이상), 반일근무(하루 4시간)도 가능합니다.
  ○ 학생인턴은 근무기간 만료 1주일 전에 인턴십 결과보고서를 제출해야 합니다.
  ○ 학생인턴이 인턴십 결과보고서를 제출한 경우, KF는 학생인턴에게 인턴십 확인서를 발급합니다.
  ○ 급여는 고용노동부 최저임금 고시 및 KF 관련 기준에 의거, 지급합니다..

3. 언제, 어떻게 지원하나요?
  ○ 이메일(intern@kf.or.kr)을 통해서 아래 서류를 상시 접수합니다. 관련 문의가 있을 경우 동 이메일로 보내주시기 바랍니다.
    - 개인정보 수집·활용 동의서 (붙임 참조)
    - 정의 지원서 (붙임 참조)
    - 자유형식의 이력서

4. 채용결과는 언제 알려주나요?
  ○ 재단에서 학생인턴 수요가 발생할 때 수시로 채용하기 때문에 일정시점에 채용여부를 통보하기는 어렵습니다. 그러나 가급적 인턴근무 희망일로부터 1주일 전에 채용여부를 알려드립니다.  

2017년 5월 28일 일요일

Special Lecture of Korean Studies, Spring 2017

SENTENCED TO LIFE: CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS IN SOUTH KOREA

Speaker:
Tom Rainey-Smith
Coordinator, Strategic Programme
Amnesty International Korea

22 May 2017
3:30-4:30PM

601 International Education Building

한국의 양심적 병역거부자들

톰 레이니-스미스
전략캠페인 간사
국제엠네스티 한국지부

2017년 5월 22일
오후 3:30

국제교육관 601호


2017년 5월 1일 월요일

2017 Summer Courses in Korean Studies

37568 Advanced Topics in East Asian Religion (Prof.Marc Mullinax)

Prof.Mullinax is a faculty of Ewha International Summer Co-ed College and Professor at Department of Religion in Mars Hill University, North Carolina, USA.

Course description

Religion's concern is that which ultimately concerns. The religions of East Asia are culturally-rich sacred quests by their members to develop stories and narratives of meaning about how their visible world works according to unseen laws and forces. Each religion has developed its own vocabulary by which it comes to a partial understanding of, and agreement with such unseen forces. Therefore, each East Asian religion is historically conditioned and culturally enriched; this course will be a rigorous exploration of how East Asian worldviews have developed these religious perspectives.

37564 Korean Film & Media Studies (Prof. Steve Choe)

Prof. Choe is a faculty of Ewha International Summer Co-ed College and Associate Professor at San Francisco State University, USA.

Course description

A 2010 news article for the Korean Herald begins: "Picking a Korean film to watch is like flipping a coin. Either you get something sweet and saccharine or you get something vicious and violent." In this course, we will look at both types of films that come out of Korea since 2000, including My Sassy Girl (2001), Lady Vengeance (2005), and The Wailing (2016). We will attempt to understand Korean cinema in the new millennium as art that purposes new ways of being, thinking, and relating to others. Issues to be covered include: the ethics of neoliberal capitalism, the spectacle of cinematic violence, morality and film genre, and the critique of melodrama. Course materials and discussion will be conducted in English.

2017년 1월 28일 토요일

New teaching faculty of spring 2017, welcome to Korean Studies (2017년 봄학기 신임교원소개)

Please welcome our new teaching faculty of spring 2017!

Dr. Myoung-sun (Kelly) Song (Ewha undergraduate, English language & literature, class 2008) and Dr. Ji-hye Ha (Ewha undergraduate, Korean language & literature, class 2007) will join our program from this spring semester.

Dr. Myoung-sun Song received her Ph.D. in Communication from University of Southern California, USA in 2016 and has been teaching at Sogang University. She will teach Multi-culturalism and Korean Society

Here are news articles introducing her recent books and works.

중앙일보: http://news.joins.com/article/20388014
아시아경제: http://view.asiae.co.kr/news/view.htm?idxno=2016081209521162893
USC: http://annenberg.usc.edu/communication/communication-phd/news/hiphop-hada-phd-grad-brings-korean-hip-hop-los-angeles

Dr. Ji-hye Ha received her Ph.D. in Korean Language Education from Ewha Womans University in 2016. She teaches Korean language for international students at Yonsei Language Center. She will teach Reading Academic Korean I.

2017년 봄학기 신임교원 소개

송명선 박사: 미국 USC Communication 박사(2016), 이화여대 영어영문학과 졸업
하지혜 박사: 이화여대 한국어교육 박사(2016), 이화여대 국어국문학과 졸업

송명선 박사님은 Multi-culturalism and Korean Society를, 하지혜 박사님은 Reading Academic Korean I을 담당할 예정입니다.